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Magnus Carlsen Wins Again In London

  • SonofPearl
  • on 2012.12.06. 11:33.

London Chess Classic 2012 logo.jpgMagnus Carlsen won yet another game at the London Chess Classic in the fifth round against Mickey Adams.

It was quite a recovery in the game for Carlsen who had been a pawn down and looked to be in trouble.  Yet, in just a few moves the situation reversed and Magnus won the pawn ending.

For the record, Magnus Carlsen's live rating is now 2860.5 Elo.

Vladimir Kramnik defeated Luke McShane in a nice game for the Russian to keep the pressure on Carlsen at the top of the leaderboard.  Kramnik will not give up his title without a fight!

Vishy Anand's game was the first to finish, and at last the world champion scored a win!  Anand defeated Gawain Jones with the black pieces to finally make a positive mark on the tournament.

Finally, Hikaru Nakamura weaved a mating net around Judit Polgar's exposed King to make it four out of four decisive games in the fifth round at the London Chess Classic.

Lev Aronian (left) took his turn in the commentary room with Danny King and Nigel Short (right)

London Chess Classic 2012 Round 5 Commentary box Lev Aronian Danny King Nigel Short.jpg

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Magnus Carlsen turned around a worse position to beat Mickey Adams

London Chess Classic 2012 Round 5 Mickey Adams Magnus Carlsen.jpg

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Vladimir Kramnik defeated Luke McShane

London Chess Classic 2012 Round 5 Vladimir Kramnik Luke McShane.jpg

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Vishy Anand completed a bad day for the English players, beating Gawain Jones.

London Chess Classic 2012 Round 5 Gawain Jones Vishy Anand.jpg

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Judit Polgar lost to Hikaru Nakamura

London Chess Classic 2012 Round 5 Judit Polgar Hikaru Nakamura.jpg

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The standings after 5 rounds (3-1-0 scoring)

Name Fed Elo Gms Pts
Carlsen, Magnus NOR 2848 5 13
Kramnik, Vladimir RUS 2795 5 11
Nakamura, Hikaru USA 2760 5 8
Adams, Michael ENG 2710 4 7
Anand, Viswanathan IND 2775 4 6
Aronian, Levon ARM 2815 4 4
Jones, Gawain C B ENG 2644 5 2
McShane, Luke ENG 2713 4 1
Polgar, Judit HUN 2705 4 1

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The 2012 London Chess Classic runs from 1-10 December , with one rest day on the 5th December. Games start at 14:00 GMT, except round four (16:00), and the final round (12:00).

The time control is 2 hours for 40 moves, then 1 hour for 20 moves, then 30 minutes to finish.  The 'Bilbao' style 3-1-0 scoring system is being used.

In the event of tied scores at the end of the competition, tie breaks are 1) # of wins 2) # of wins with black, 3) head-to-head result. If these mathematical tiebreakers are not enough, then there will be rapid tie-break games and if needed, a final sudden death game.

More information on all the London Chess Classic events is at the official website, including live games and video commentary.

Photos by Ray Morris-Hill.  Games via TWIC.

2012 London Chess Classic pairings shrink to fit.jpg

11321 megtekintés 54 hozzászólás
6 szavazat

Hozzászólások


  • 17 hónap ezelőtt

    Stella_Woo

    they say you never should play like a computer because you cannot equal a computer's calculating speed. Sooner or later you'll run out of time.

  • 17 hónap ezelőtt

    ezra4moso

    Carlsen beat em' all.

  • 17 hónap ezelőtt

    P_G_M

    @gray-orange-gray

    I agree with your comment.

    It is a mistake for chess players to play against computers. Carlsen has stated in the past that he does not plays against computers.

    Chess tournaments are won against human chess players that fall into swindles that start with a slightly questionable move that creates a position that is difficult to evaluate when there is time pressure and the opponent ends up missing the right move which in turns leads him into a bad endgame position, and the rest is matter of endgame technique which Carlsen is becoming little by little the best in the chess world.

    For a swindle to work it needs to be played at the right moment, after several hours of playing and when the opponent is under time pressure, and Carlsen has become an expert in timing this type of opportunities, and the other GM are falling into them Laughing 

    As a matter of fact last week Karjakin just won a game against Morozevich with a swindle that originated with a questionable move, the Houdini suggested move resulted in draw. 

    Computers play to "not to lose", they will never play a calculated risky questionable move in a position that is about equal in time pressure because computers just follows a string of commands, they can not think "what if I make this questionable natural looking move and if my opponent do not find the correct move because of build up stress due to time pressure and the fact that we have been playing for almost four hours (first time-control) or six hours (second time-control) I will end up with a slightly better winning position." This is what Carlsen has become an expert in evaluating during top level chess games. This is what is known as the psychology of chess and playing against computers do not improves this very important chess skill. Playing against computers kills this chess skill.

  • 17 hónap ezelőtt

    P_G_M

    Hey guys Carlsen style of play has become Capablanca style of play.

    "Capablanca’s games generally take the following course: he begins with a series of extremely fine prophylactic maneuvers, which neutralize his opponent’s attempts to complicate the game; he then proceeds, slowly but surely, to set up an attacking position. This attacking position, after a series of simplifications, is transformed into a favorable endgame, which he conducts with matchless technique." – Aaron Nimzowitsch

  • 17 hónap ezelőtt

    drvijayshah

    well done ANAND  Laughing

  • 17 hónap ezelőtt

    KamranKazemi

    nakamura+100=carlsen

  • 17 hónap ezelőtt

    Pink-Beret

    That was a game I was expeting Anand to play.Cool

  • 17 hónap ezelőtt

    Stanya

    Please please win, Kramnik! Beat Carlson!!!!!!!

  • 17 hónap ezelőtt

    dzindzifan

    I'm a huge Judit Polgar fan, but one thing also certain ... don't relax at time-control or Naka will Rock Ya!  Nice work Hikaru!

  • 17 hónap ezelőtt

    nightmare_chess

    WOW...anand strike back!Cool

  • 17 hónap ezelőtt

    wtf_BobbyF

    what i meant its that i can't remember his games, they are not exciting, he usually arrives to the endgame with a slight advantage and then scores the win... i dont see exciting and risky combinations... on the other hand i can tell u that i do remember a lot of exciting Kasparov games, Fisher games, Morphy games, etc.

    He's so good and yet a little boring, maybe its the nature of today's chess

  • 17 hónap ezelőtt

    EternalChess

    Gray-Orange-Gray I agree with you, but his endgame play is pure-computer, he never EVER makes a subpar move in the endgame where he usually achieves his victory.

  • 17 hónap ezelőtt

    gray-orange-gray

    "Magnus ... he just improve his position very slowly with each move to win every game... he's like a computer"
    I'm not sure that I agree with this. Sometimes, yeah, he's like a computer in the same way that any top GM is, i.e. he plays pretty accurate moves. But if you see a computer analysis of some of these London games, you may notice that a few of his key moves seem just a little bit sub-optimal from the computer's perspective -- maybe in a way that is slightly deliberate. That is, he sometimes plays moves that are not quite 'the best' objectively, but which keep the position just a little more unclear to human eyes. Then, when his opponent makes a mistake in this unclear environment, he pounces with pretty severe accuracy. It's a nice strategy, which might win some games that a computer would just draw, despite being technically 'better' in its play.

  • 17 hónap ezelőtt

    Champeknight

    Carlsen is superior to everyone else in this tourney. He will make short work of Kasparov if the latter plays a match with him.

  • 17 hónap ezelőtt

    wtf_BobbyF

    its very strange how it seems that Magnus never do something amazing or exciting, he just improve his position very slowly with each move to win every game... he's like a computer

  • 17 hónap ezelőtt

    wtf_BobbyF

    what a great game by Anand, very agresive and exciting...

  • 17 hónap ezelőtt

    kvlc

    Did Anand start taking his vitamins again?  First time in a while I've seen him play like a World Champion.

  • 17 hónap ezelőtt

    KostasA

    Go Kramnik!You played an excellent game!

  • 17 hónap ezelőtt

    MaxiKing

    Go Kramnik! ;D

  • 17 hónap ezelőtt

    MaartenSmit

    @geographybuff: Black is threatening Nf3+ Kh1 Rh4#. Nf3+ can only be stopped by Rf7, but after Kxf7 (obviously) black has exactly the same problems. He can also play Be7 to stop Rh4#, but then Nf3+ Kh1 Rg1#. So black has 1 desperate move to delay mate, but otherwise it's just unavoidable mate in 2.

    Edit: Drak0dan has a longer variation to delay mate. Point stays the same (and I missed Bg2#.. that's a lot of mate threats at the same time :p)

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